Dr. Michael Klesel

Postdoc | University of Siegen

Michael Klesel

Michael works as a senior scholar at the University of Siegen. His research interests includes the digitalization of work and its effects on the individual. Most of his research is conducted in the light of Individual Information Systems (IIS) investigating the role of smartphones, tablets, or wearables at work. His research includes both: exploring and understanding emerging phenomena such as technostress and the conduction of design-relevant research in order to derive design-implications. His methodological portfolio covers qualitative methods (e.g. case studies) and quantitative methods (e.g. survey studies or experiments). His publications appeared in leading IS journals including Communications of the Association of Information Systems (CAIS) and major IS conferences including the International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS), the European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS), the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), and American Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS).

Selected Publications

A Test for Multigroup Comparison in Partial Least Squares Path Modeling

Authors: Klesel, M., Schuberth, F., Henseler, J., and Niehaves, B.

Outlet: Internet Research

Abstract: People seem to function according to different models, which implies that in business and social sciences, heterogeneity is a rule rather than an exception. Researchers can investigate such hetero-geneity through multigroup analysis (MGA). In the context of partial least squares path modeling (PLS-PM), MGA is currently applied to perform multiple comparisons of parameters across groups. However, this approach has significant drawbacks: first, the whole model is not considered when comparing groups, and second, the family-wise error rate is higher than the predefined significance level when the groups are indeed homogenous, leading to incorrect conclusions. Against this back-ground, this paper presents and validates new MGA tests, which are applicable in the context of PLS-PM, and compares their efficacy to existing approaches.

Full reference:
Klesel, M. Schuberth, F., Henseler, J., and Niehaves, B. forthcoming. “A Test for Multigroup Comparison in Partial Least Squares Path Modeling,” Internet Research. https://doi.org/10.1108/IntR-11-2017-0418.
Does the Ability to Choose Matter? On the Relationship between Bring Your Own Behavior and IT Satisfaction

Authors: Klesel, M., Kampling, H., Bretschneider, U., Niehaves, B.

Outlet: Communications of the Association of Information Systems

Abstract: Organizational tasks are increasingly fulfilled using privately owned consumer technologies including private devices (e.g. smartphones) or private internet accounts (e.g. email accounts). A major reason for this type of bring your own behavior (BYOB) is a higher level of satisfaction. However, little research exists that theoretically explores and empirically tests this assumption. This study sheds light on this phenomenon by analyzing the effect of BYOB on IT satisfaction. Drawing from social cognitive theory, we propose choice self-efficacy as a new construct that intermediates between BYOB and IT satisfaction. Building upon results from survey data (n = 400), we provide new evidence that BYOB has a positive effect on IT satisfaction, whereby choice self-efficacy plays a vital element as it mediates this relationship. Since IT satisfaction is an important processor of technology use and performance, we derive important implications for future research on IT consumerization. Furthermore, we provide several conclusions for practitioners and discuss how to enhance IT satisfaction and choice self-efficacy.

Full reference:
Klesel, M., Kampling, H., Bretschneider, U., and Niehaves, B. (2018). “Does the Ability to Choose Matter? On the Relationship between Bring Your Own Behavior and IT Satisfaction,” Communications of the Association for Information Systems: Vol. 43, Article 36.DOI: 10.17705/1CAIS.04336.
Transgressive Use of Technology

Authors: Klesel, M.,, Lemmer, K., Bretschneider, B., Niehaves, B.

Outlet: Communications of the Association of Information Systems

Abstract: Technology use is a central construct of information systems (IS) research that has been continuously reflected and re-conceptualized in order to understand use behavior. In light of the individualization of IS, use behavior has changed significantly. Therefore, existing conceptualizations, which primarily exist in a utilitarian environment, are not sufficient to explore current phenomena comprehensively. We propose transgressive use of technology as a new conceptualization of technology use that specifically acknowledges the individualization of IS. Our conceptualization is based on rich data from a multiple case study including 67 interviews from the service and manufacturing industry suggesting that transgressive use has four sub-dimensions: degree of individualization, degree of exploration, degree of boundary spanning, and degree of intensity. We show that transgressive use not only corresponds to previous conceptualizations but also extends them significantly. We conclude by providing propositions on how transgressive use can enhance future research.

Full reference:
Klesel, M., Lemmer, K., Bretschneider, U., and Niehaves, B. 2017. Transgressive Use of Technology, presented at the Thirty Eighth International Conference on Information Systems, Seoul, South Korea.

Publications

Journal Publications (double-blinded)

Klesel, M. Schuberth, F., Henseler, J., and Niehaves, B. forthcoming. “A Test for Multigroup Comparison in Partial Least Squares Path Modeling,” Internet Research. https://doi.org/10.1108/IntR-11-2017-0418.
Klesel, M., Kampling, H., Bretschneider, U., and Niehaves, B. (2018). “Does the Ability to Choose Matter? On the Relationship between Bring Your Own Behavior and IT Satisfaction,” Communications of the Association for Information Systems: Vol. 43, Article 36.DOI: 10.17705/1CAIS.04336.

Conference porceedings (double-blinded)

Klesel, M., Weber, S., Walsdorff, F., and Niehaves, B. 2019. Are Employees Following the Rules? On the Effectiveness of IT Consumerization Policies, presented at the 14th International Conference on Wirtschaftsinformatik, Siegen, Germany.
Oschinsky, F. M., Klesel, M., Ressel, N., and Niehaves, B. 2019. Where Are Your Thoughts? On the Relationship between Technology Use and Mind Wandering, presented at the 52th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Honolulu, Hi, USA.
Kordyaka, B., Klesel, M., and Jahn, K. 2019. Perpetrators in League of Legends: Scale Development and Validation of Toxic Behavior, presented at the 52th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Honolulu, Hi, USA.
Klesel, M., Narjes, N., and Niehaves, B. 2018. Conceptualizing IT Resilience: An Explorative Approach, presented at the Multikonferenz Wirtschaftsinformatik, Lüneburg, Germany.
Klesel, M., Lemmer, K., Bretschneider, U., and Niehaves, B. 2017. Transgressive Use of Technology, presented at the Thirty Eighth International Conference on Information Systems, Seoul, South Korea.
Jahn, K., Klesel, M., Lemmer, K., Weigel, A., and Niehaves, B. 2016. Individual Boundary Management: An Empirical Investigation on Technology-Related Tactics, presented at the 20th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems, Chiayi, Taiwan.
Kampling, H., Klesel, M., and Niehaves, B. 2016. On Experiments in Design Science Research and Theory Development: A Literature Review, presented at the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Koloa, Hi, USA.
Klesel, M., Jahn, K., Müller, M., and Niehaves, B. 2016. How to Design Information Technology That Facilitates Detachment from Work: An Empirical Investigation of Work-Discontinuance Intention , presented at the 20th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems, Chiayi, Taiwan.
Klesel, M., Ndicu, M., and Niehaves, B. 2016. Exploring Psychological Ownership of IT: An Empirical Study, presented at the 24th European Conference on Information Systems, Istanbul, Turkey.
Mueller, M., Klesel, M., Heger, O., and Niehaves, B. 2016. Empirical Insights on Individual Innovation Behavior: A Qualitative Study on IT-Consumerization, presented at the 20th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems.
Klesel, M., Mokosch, G., and Niehaves, B. 2015. Maturing, Flagshipping and Piggybacking: On the Use of Structuration Theory in Information Systems Research, presented at the 21st Americas Conference on Information Systems, Puerto Rico.
Mokosch, G., Klesel, M., and Niehaves, B. 2015. Putting Flesh on the Duality of Structure: The Case of IT Consumerization, presented at the 21st Americas Conference on Information Systems, Puerto Rico.

Working paper

Klesel, M. 2018. “A Conceptual Model for IT Work Autonomy,” FoKoS Siegen (working paper).

Others

Klesel, M., Kordyaka, B., Prüßmann J. F., and Niehaves, B. 2018a. “Berücksichtigung Individueller Bedarfe Am Beispiel von Erreichbarkeitszeiten,” in Arbeit Der Zukunft: Thesen Und Gestaltungsansätze Für Den Arbeitsplatz Der Zukunft, N. Kratzer (Hrsg.), München, S. 11–12.
Klesel, M., Kordyaka, B., Prüßmann J. F., and Niehaves, B. 2018a. “Der Umgang mit Erreichbarkeitszeiten,” in Arbeit Der Zukunft: Thesen Und Gestaltungsansätze Für Den Arbeitsplatz Der Zukunft, N. Kratzer (Hrsg.), München, S. 11–12.
Klesel, M., Kordyaka, B., and Niehaves, B. 2018. Zwischen “Nine to Five” Und 24/7: Wege Zur Bedarfsgerechten Erreichbarkeit in Zeiten von Smartphones & Co., Siegen: Forschungskolleg Siegen.
Heger, O., Kampling, H., Klesel, M., and Niehaves, B. 2016. “Ethik in Forschung Und Lehre Gestaltungsorientierter Disziplinen,” FoKoS Blickpunkt, Siegen, p. 6.
Heger, O., Kordyaka, B., Klesel, M., and Niehaves, B. 2016. “Zwischen ‘Laissez-Faire’ Und ‘Nine-to-Five’. Forschung Für Verantwortungsvolle Kommunikation Im Unternehmen,” Technikfolgenabschätzung - Theorie Und Praxis (TATuP) (25:3), pp. 55–58.
Niehaves, B., Klesel, M., Jahn, K., and Heger, O. 2016. “IT-Consumerization - Fluch Oder Segen Für Die Zukunft Der Öffentlichen Verwaltung?,” Public Governance (Herbst), pp. 16–18.

Publons

Contact

Michael Klesel
Kohlbettstraße 15
57072 Siegen